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Seguridad en América reconoce a los 100 más influyente/ Seguridad en América recognizes the 100 most influential

January 30th, 2017 Comments off

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AFIMAC’s Maria Teresa Septien quoted in Seguridad en America Magazine ’10 Best Security Practices for Companies’

January 3rd, 2017 Comments off

AFIMAC Director Business Development Latin America, Maria Teresa Septien is quoted in Seguridad en America Magazine’s article ’10 Best Security Practices for Companies’.

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AFIMAC Maria Teresa Septien relató en la revista Seguridad América ‘Las 10 Mejores prácticas de Seguridad en las Empresas’

January 3rd, 2017 Comments off

AFIMAC Maria Teresa Septien relató en la revista Seguridad América ‘Las 10 Mejores prácticas de Seguridad en las Empresas’.

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AFIMAC Maria Teresa Septien reconocida como una de los 100 más influyentes de la Seguridad Privada en México

January 3rd, 2017 Comments off

AFIMAC Maria Teresa Septien reconocida como una de los 100 más influyentes de la Seguridad Privada en México.

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AFIMAC’s Maria Teresa Septien recognized as one of the Top 100 Security Professionals in Mexico

January 3rd, 2017 Comments off

AFIMAC Director Business Development Latin America, Maria Teresa Septien has been recognized by Seguridad en America magazine as one of the Top 100 most influential security professionals in Mexico. Read the full article here.

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South Florida Business Journal: ‘Peter Martin On Combining Passions For Business And Security’

August 29th, 2016 Comments off

Peter

Peter Martin, CEO of AFIMAC Global, is really in the business development space, even though, on the surface, his day job could be described with one word: security. AFIMAC provides a fleet of security-related services from bodyguards to transport to mitigating kidnapping situations. But what got Martin into the security industry in the first place was a passion for business and a desire to blend security with growth.

AFIMAC and Martin are often consulted by companies looking to enter new international markets or exit markets in sustainable ways. Martin knows which economies and countries are stable, and which may be on the edge of collapse, and he and AFIMAC can provide clients with intelligence on how to safely navigate business opportunities around the globe. AFIMAC’s global headquarters are in Miami.

Where are AFIMAC’s offices?
I’m staring right across the 836 at the Miami International Airport as we speak. Watching planes taking off is actually very soothing. You can see the massive cargo planes taking off. We relocated in 2012, and it’s been very good for us. We’re a global company, [so] it’s a great launch point for all of our services. From a strategic standpoint, it’s been great. We relocated from Cleveland.

Did you always know you were going to go into security? It wasn’t quite that. I come from a family of police officers, and I knew I wanted to do something in the form of private security or law enforcement. I graduated with a law and security administration degree, and from there I got a job in corrections in Canada. I did that for about four years, but corrections is a very difficult world in which to affect change, and I wanted to do something where I could combine business passion with security passion. At that time, in the 1980s, security had a very different view, a pre-9/11 view, and it was really viewed as an impediment to business.

And were you able to merge business and security when you went into cash logistics? After 9/11, security became very popular. When I transferred into cash logistics, to a global armored car company, we had a real position to affect change. The value we brought was business-enabled, and that really sparked a passion for me not to just work in security, but in major crime, as well. There was lot going on – kidnapping of family members, grenades being thrown at armored cars, attacks, etc. It was a real education.

What’s the value of security to business today?
We work with global clients, and what we bring is a different perspective. A lot of our businesses have global footprints and need to go to places that are considered dangerous like Somalia, the Ivory Coast, Brazil, Honduras, etc. We look at the strategic business values and help companies achieve their goals and help them quickly enter the areas they want to enter into.

How many countries have you been to?
Personally, in excess of 80 countries.

What is your day-to-day like?
My day starts out with a combination of internal business; we have six companies in our portfolio. I spend about 70 percent of my day working on internal pieces of business, helping people get to new markets, solving problems. And then the rest is dealing with emergencies. We are in the crisis business, after all.

Do companies consult with you when they’re thinking about entering new markets?
Yes, they do. We’ll provide them with a white paper and analysis when they want to go to a new place. There are opportunities, but there may also be pushback. On the other side, sometimes companies will consult with us if they want to exit a market. For example, if you try to pull out of Venezuela, there are potential criminal charges that could be weighed against the owner.

What do you do outside of work?
Pretty much every minute outside of work is spent with my kids and my wife. We like to do very normal things like take advantage of the beach and try to get away from our smartphones.

How many phones do you have?
I have three cellphones that I rotate. I have a BlackBerry for traveling to certain areas because it just works better. I have a Samsung Galaxy, and a Note Five that is excellent for marking up documents and annotating things on the move. I don’t carry all three all the time, just when I’m traveling.

Peter Martin

Age: 48
Current position: CEO, AFIMAC Global
Past positions: President, AFIMAC Global; VP of Corporate Security & Investigations, Group 4 Securicor Cash Logistics
Birthplace: Brantford, Ontario
Residence: Plantation
Current boards/associations: Board, National Association of Manufacturers; Education Committee, International Security Management Association; Young Presidents’ Organization
Education: Carleton University

AFIMAC CEO Peter Martin discusses Rio Olympics security on Fox News

August 19th, 2016 Comments off

AFIMAC CEO Peter Martin discusses security concerns at Rio 2016 Olympics on Fox News Special Report.

Original Date: August 12, 2016

CEO Peter Martin quoted in The Sun article ‘RIO BOMB THREAT’

August 15th, 2016 Comments off

Page One

A GROUP of eco-terrorists who detonated a nail bomb in Brazil last week have issued a chilling threat to the Rio Olympics – in revenge for ripping up the city to make way for the games.

Extremists at the “Sociedade Secreta Silvestre” organisation – who claimed responsibility for detonating a pressure cooker packed with metal in Brasilia – say they will bomb the Olympics.

They have “declared war” after Rio games chiefs failed to fulfil promises to plant 24 million trees in the city and clean up the polluted Guanabara Bay.

The terrorists were also angered after an Olympic golf course was built on 58,000 square metres of natural park for the games – which had environmentalism as the opening ceremony theme.

A manifesto on the group’s website read: “We will use the Rio 2016 Olympic Games to attack and declare war on hyper-civilisation and its dead world of concrete and steel.

“Our similar units in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo are as well prepared as the tens of thousands of cowards mobilised to strengthen public security for the Games.

“And guarantee that in the states where events occur they will not pass unharmed but will be severely attacked.

“If you don’t want to be within a blast zone, lock yourselves in your basements and stay there.

“Tourists, if you don’t want to share the same end, go back to your rotting cities. You are not welcome nor will you ever be welcome here, except by our explosives.

“We know there are gaps in security and they will be properly used.”

They claimed to be behind the blast of a pressure cooker device in a car park outside a shopping centre in Brasilia, a few hundred metres from the hotel of the host’s Olympic men’s football team.

The explosion, last week, did not cause any injuries.

Brazilian authorities have played down the threat – but security experts were worried.

Peter Martin, a global security consultant, told The Sun: “Despite all the focus on IS these guys are the only ones to have successfully detonated a bomb with actual intent to do some real damage.

“They’re a pretty serious threat. “This seems to have been suppressed by the government and media in Brazil. Environmental groups wanted a lot of things out of the Olympics they have not got.

“They are also the kind of militants who are very difficult to track.”

CEO Peter Martin discusses security issues at Rio 2016 Olympics on Fox News

August 9th, 2016 Comments off

AFIMAC Global CEO Peter Martin discusses security issues at Rio 2016 Olympics on Fox News Special Report.

AFIMAC Global CEO Peter Martin quoted in CNN article ‘Rio Olympics: Brazil vows to be ready in case terror strikes’

July 8th, 2016 Comments off

CNN

Rio de Janeiro has long had a reputation for dangerous favelas, with muggings and kidnappings not uncommon. But authorities are stepping up measures to tackle a different kind of security threat altogether when the Rio Olympic Games begin August 5.

Wary that the international sporting event is a potential prime target for terrorists, Brazilian forces have been working with specialist French SWAT teams to simulate attack scenarios.

In one drill, Brazil special forces and a police dog chase down an armed gunman to thwart a possible attack on Rio’s subway system. The dramatic display is meant to reassure journalists that a country with limited experience in handling terrorism is ready for the unthinkable.

“There is not a specific threat,” said Lt. Gen. Luiz Linhares with the Brazilian Ministry of Defense. “You have to screen for a great (spectrum) of threat.”

The Brazilian government said it is not taking any chances — especially after the recent terror attacks around the world, including in Turkey, Bangladesh, Iraq and Saudi Arabia.

Security is visible at a checkpoint Tuesday at the Olympic Village in Rio de Janeiro.

Linhares said authorities will be screening the ticket names of the hundreds of thousands coming for the Rio Olympics, South America’s first games.

Brazil’s intelligence agency reported in April that the number of those influenced by ISIS ideology had increased in recent months but insisted there was no threat to the Olympics.

Brazil mostly lacks the presence of extremist networks that terrorists rely upon, but at least one ISIS fighter tweeted after the November 2015 Paris attacks that Brazil would be next. Several ISIS members have launched a Telegram channel in Portuguese, the official language of Brazil.

The UK government’s latest travel warning advises citizens going to Brazil that “there is an underlying threat from terrorism. Attacks, although unlikely, could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by foreigners.”

There have been no major terror attacks in Brazil in recent years, but Peter Martin, CEO of security firm AFIMAC Global, said the country does have serious organized crime issues and therefore could leverage high-level training to combat that problem within the Brazilian special forces.

“When you’re going after gangs like that, there are a lot of similarities to terrorists with intercepted communications, informants trying to penetrate the organization, trying to understand what the next target is,” Martin said.

“It is different, but a lot of the methodologies apply. Brazil has been doing that for a long time.”

Problems with police

Police and firefighters protest pay delays this week at Rio de Janeiro’s main airport.

Some 22,000 troops will be stationed at the games, officials said, but the capability of the police force has been the focus of recent scrutiny.

For days, members of Rio’s law enforcement have been protesting over late wages. The state of Rio de Janeiro requested an emergency federal bailout after it said it was unable to fund essential public services.

Angry police officers have been camping out at the international arrivals hall of Rio de Janeiro’s main airport holding up banners that say, “Welcome to hell,” and warning visitors they will not be safe in the country.

A 2.9 billion-real bailout (roughly $850 million) was made available last week after acting Gov. Francisco Dornelles said the games could be a “big failure” without the funds. It’s believed that the back pay will be distributed this week.

Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes told CNN this week the state was doing a “terrible” job in regard to security in the lead-up to the games.

“It’s completely failing at its work of policing and taking care of people,” Paes said.

But Brazilian officials later put on a united front to assure the world that Rio was up to the task of hosting sport’s greatest showpiece.

Delays in construction

Also complicating security efforts is the unfinished construction of several Olympics sites and infrastructure.

Corruption probe into Olympics construction projects

“The construction is so far behind. (There are) the roads that were meant to have been built by now, and we’re not sure if they’re going to be open in time,” Martin said.

A tremendous amount of planning goes into mapping out the fastest routes to secure medical attention or safe zones. Parking for events may end up being farther away, he said, which means exposing people to being outside the security perimeter for longer periods of time.

“Because of the lack of development, we’re still not being told where all of those are going to be right now. Usually by now, we’d have that planned and done.”

What to do if you’re going to Rio

Martin said anyone traveling to Rio for the Olympics should know how to reach emergency services and monitor the situation on an ongoing basis.

“People need to understand that these situations are fluid, and it’s not enough to make an assessment a month out and say, ‘I’m good to go.’ You want to monitor the situation quite frequently,” he said.

“Understand that the police response is going to be limited potentially if they go on strike. Know your local hospitals, know how to dial (numbers). Take more personal responsibility to your safety.”

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