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Facebook Spent $12.5 Million to Protect Zuckerberg Since 2013

August 6th, 2018 Comments off

By Anders Melin
April 28, 2016

Facebook Inc. revealed that it spent $4.26 million on security for Mark Zuckerberg last year, its first disclosure of such costs, and the highest among companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index that have filed proxy statements for fiscal 2015.

The expense brings the total cost from 2013 to 2015 to $12.5 million, according to a regulatory filing. The cost was “to address safety concerns due to specific threats to his safety arising directly as a result of his position as our founder, Chairman, and CEO,” the company said in the filing. Zuckerberg is the world’s eighth-richest person with $47 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.

Facebook spent $5.6 million for Zuckerberg’s security in 2014 and $2.65 million in 2013. Last year’s expense exceeds the $1.53 million Oracle Corp. spent to protect Executive Chairman Larry Ellison in fiscal 2015 and Amazon.com Inc.’s $1.6 million for Jeff Bezos, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The figure also outstrips other famous executives. Berkshire Hathaway Inc. paid $370,244 for personal and home security for billionaire Warren Buffett in 2015. Apple Inc. spent $209,151 on Tim Cook.

Facebook made the disclosure this week after the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in August questioned why the costs had never been listed in filings as a taxable perquisite. In response, Facebook argued that a “business-oriented security concern” identified for Zuckerberg exempted it from having to report those expenses. After discussions with SEC staff, the company reversed its position, according to a filing.

Home Security

Facebook spokesman Jonathan Thaw declined to comment. Chief executives of global businesses are often required by their boards to travel on companyprovided planes or cars even for personal trips. More than half of firms in the S&P 100 Index had such policies last year.

Facebook provides Zuckerberg with a home security system and guards who also protect his house in San Francisco’s Mission District. The team is overseen by a former U.S. Secret Service agent who protected President Barack Obama.

Security “should be a board of directors’ first and foremost concern,” especially at companies built around a central figure, said Peter Martin, chief executive of security consultancy Afimac Global. “As a shareholder, you want to make sure that your CEO is protected.”

Closer Look

That doesn’t come cheap. Each around-the-clock assignment requires four fulltime guards, which annually can cost more than $80,000 each, said Christopher Falkenberg, chief executive of New York-based Insite Security Inc., which provides protection to clients including hedge funds. A security director can earn about $200,000 a year.

Recent terrorist attacks in two European capitals and an office shooting in San Bernardino, California, have prompted some boards to re-examine security. While the risk for a little known top executive may be low, a person’s public prominence can quickly change, much thanks to social media, Falkenberg said. Oracle’s cost in fiscal 2015 was for security at Ellison’s residence. Home protection systems can include camera surveillance, pressure pads located near doors or walkways to detect movement, and dense vegetation or crushed gravel that’s noisy to walk on beneath windows to deter intruders, Afimac’s Martin said.

“It is important to keep the boss safe, but there comes a point — certainly south of the $1 million mark — where shareholders deserve a far clearer explanation of the risks and provisions and the justification,” said Michael Pryce-Jones, director of corporate governance at CtW Investment Group, which advocates for pension funds that collectively manage $250 billion.

Still, rigorous programs that come with steep costs can be warranted for some, said Paul Viollis, CEO of security provider Viollis Group International. “It all comes down to having fiduciary responsibility,” Viollis said. “Not providing protection would be like going to the Super Bowl with nobody to block for the quarterback.”

FocusPoint CEO quoted in Vice article discussing concert security in wake of Vegas

October 3rd, 2017 Comments off

By:  Francisco Alvarado

Originally published here

When Stephen Paddock turned the Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas into the deadliest shooting in modern US history on Sunday, killing at least 59 people and injuring 527 others, it wasn’t the first time in recent memory that a live-music event served as a soft target for mass bloodshed.

In June, a suicide bomber killed 22 people and wounded 59 more at an Ariana Grande concert in the UK, the blast driving dozens of panic-stricken attendees to jump railings as they made their escape. And perhaps most notoriously, in late 2015, an Islamic State–affiliated terrorist cell carried out coordinated attacks in Paris that claimed nearly 100 lives at an Eagles of Death Metal show in the city’s Bataclan theater, where some concertgoers found themselves trapped inside the venue. (Dozens more civilians were killed in other attacks around the city.)

If they were ever a relative safe haven for (mostly young) people to enjoy their favorite artists up close, live-music shows must now be understood as easy targets for mass murderers of any ideology, a new normal that could result in drastic public-safety measures at future concerts and festivals, according to security experts specializing in large-scale events.

“The top threats we have today didn’t exist three years ago,” Jason Porter, eastern region vice president for global private security firm Pinkerton, said. “These heinous acts are something that have to be at the forefront of every major event planner’s mind.”

While it is virtually impossible to plan for an individual with an arsenal of firearms raining down storms of bullets on 22,000 concertgoers, event organizers and security firms they hire will have to dedicate new resources to planning for surprise attacks. That could lead to live showrunners implementing new pre-event surveillance sweeps, hiring bevies of new off-duty undercover police officers, and possibly taking over entire hotel floors.

“Venue locations will be more scrutinized, as well as taking additional steps to secure hotel rooms that face the venue to prevent something like this from happening again,” Porter said. “Although when you are talking about a massive hotel like Mandalay Bay, it could be hundreds of rooms. The cost would be enormous.”

Advances in police technology could also provide event organizers and concert security teams with tools to respond quicker to an active-shooter situation, according to Greg Pearson, CEO of global risk consulting firm FocusPoint International. He suggested promoters should consider holding events in cities where police departments have deployed gunfire detection systems like Shotspotter, even as some experts question the effectiveness of those programs.

If nothing else, these systems do seem capable of helping first responders locate a shooter’s position faster than calls to 911. “They would know where the bullets are coming from, the type of rounds being used, how many weapons are being fired, and if there is more than one shooter,” Pearson said. “In Vegas, the SWAT team came in a tactical formation, but they had no clue what they were walking into.”

The smoke from Paddock’s weapons setting off his hotel room alarm is reportedly what police used to hone in on his location, and as is often the case during mass-shooting events, initial accounts erroneously suggested there might be more than one shooter. Investigators found 23 firearms in Paddock’s Mandalay Bay hotel suite on the 32nd floor, where he carried out his attack. An additional 19 firearms were discovered in his home.

It’s already common for music festivals to design their own apps to help people enjoy the shows, but promoters will now be under new pressure to be ready to deliver emergency messages and alerts to patrons, according to Pearson. “If there is an active shooter, you can notify everyone about shots being fired from this general vicinity and guide them toward exit points,” he told me.

Perhaps most important, promoters and venue operators will likely take new steps to train employees about how to get people out of catastrophic incident. “When an emotionally charged event like a mass shooting takes place, most people will run back to the area where they came in,” Pearson said. “The problem is that everyone is heading in the same direction. That artery gets choked of and people get caught in a death funnel.”

Steve Adelman, vice president of the Event Safety Alliance, said the Scottsdale, Arizona–based nonprofit organization conducts active-shooter response training for concert security personnel from around the country. “We are training you to recognize what gunfire sounds like in a noisy concert or sports venue,” Adelman said. “We are going to teach you how to fight through the paralysis most people suffer so you can be a shepherd that leads people to safety.”

The alliance is also training concert security workers and event operations managers what to do when an individual drives a vehicle into a crowd or when a bomb is detonated inside or near the venue. “We are teaching people how to get crowds to safety quickly,” Adelman said. “Hopefully in a direction of shelter and away from the bad guy.”

Even so, Adelman doesn’t believe Paddock’s homicidal rampage should—or will—prevent promoters from putting together large shows in concentrated urban areas. “Is the lesson here that we don’t hold open air festivals next door to anything anymore?” he said. “I doubt it. This incident shouldn’t change the way people feel about going to shows.”

CEO Peter Martin discusses security issues at Rio 2016 Olympics on Fox News

August 9th, 2016 Comments off

AFIMAC Global CEO Peter Martin discusses security issues at Rio 2016 Olympics on Fox News Special Report.

Adam Curtis, AFIMAC Senior Director Corporate Investigations, quoted in Canadian Security article ‘Sharper Focus’

July 11th, 2016 Comments off

AFIMAC Global CEO Peter Martin quoted in CNN article ‘Rio Olympics: Brazil vows to be ready in case terror strikes’

July 8th, 2016 Comments off

CNN

Rio de Janeiro has long had a reputation for dangerous favelas, with muggings and kidnappings not uncommon. But authorities are stepping up measures to tackle a different kind of security threat altogether when the Rio Olympic Games begin August 5.

Wary that the international sporting event is a potential prime target for terrorists, Brazilian forces have been working with specialist French SWAT teams to simulate attack scenarios.

In one drill, Brazil special forces and a police dog chase down an armed gunman to thwart a possible attack on Rio’s subway system. The dramatic display is meant to reassure journalists that a country with limited experience in handling terrorism is ready for the unthinkable.

“There is not a specific threat,” said Lt. Gen. Luiz Linhares with the Brazilian Ministry of Defense. “You have to screen for a great (spectrum) of threat.”

The Brazilian government said it is not taking any chances — especially after the recent terror attacks around the world, including in Turkey, Bangladesh, Iraq and Saudi Arabia.

Security is visible at a checkpoint Tuesday at the Olympic Village in Rio de Janeiro.

Linhares said authorities will be screening the ticket names of the hundreds of thousands coming for the Rio Olympics, South America’s first games.

Brazil’s intelligence agency reported in April that the number of those influenced by ISIS ideology had increased in recent months but insisted there was no threat to the Olympics.

Brazil mostly lacks the presence of extremist networks that terrorists rely upon, but at least one ISIS fighter tweeted after the November 2015 Paris attacks that Brazil would be next. Several ISIS members have launched a Telegram channel in Portuguese, the official language of Brazil.

The UK government’s latest travel warning advises citizens going to Brazil that “there is an underlying threat from terrorism. Attacks, although unlikely, could be indiscriminate, including in places frequented by foreigners.”

There have been no major terror attacks in Brazil in recent years, but Peter Martin, CEO of security firm AFIMAC Global, said the country does have serious organized crime issues and therefore could leverage high-level training to combat that problem within the Brazilian special forces.

“When you’re going after gangs like that, there are a lot of similarities to terrorists with intercepted communications, informants trying to penetrate the organization, trying to understand what the next target is,” Martin said.

“It is different, but a lot of the methodologies apply. Brazil has been doing that for a long time.”

Problems with police

Police and firefighters protest pay delays this week at Rio de Janeiro’s main airport.

Some 22,000 troops will be stationed at the games, officials said, but the capability of the police force has been the focus of recent scrutiny.

For days, members of Rio’s law enforcement have been protesting over late wages. The state of Rio de Janeiro requested an emergency federal bailout after it said it was unable to fund essential public services.

Angry police officers have been camping out at the international arrivals hall of Rio de Janeiro’s main airport holding up banners that say, “Welcome to hell,” and warning visitors they will not be safe in the country.

A 2.9 billion-real bailout (roughly $850 million) was made available last week after acting Gov. Francisco Dornelles said the games could be a “big failure” without the funds. It’s believed that the back pay will be distributed this week.

Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes told CNN this week the state was doing a “terrible” job in regard to security in the lead-up to the games.

“It’s completely failing at its work of policing and taking care of people,” Paes said.

But Brazilian officials later put on a united front to assure the world that Rio was up to the task of hosting sport’s greatest showpiece.

Delays in construction

Also complicating security efforts is the unfinished construction of several Olympics sites and infrastructure.

Corruption probe into Olympics construction projects

“The construction is so far behind. (There are) the roads that were meant to have been built by now, and we’re not sure if they’re going to be open in time,” Martin said.

A tremendous amount of planning goes into mapping out the fastest routes to secure medical attention or safe zones. Parking for events may end up being farther away, he said, which means exposing people to being outside the security perimeter for longer periods of time.

“Because of the lack of development, we’re still not being told where all of those are going to be right now. Usually by now, we’d have that planned and done.”

What to do if you’re going to Rio

Martin said anyone traveling to Rio for the Olympics should know how to reach emergency services and monitor the situation on an ongoing basis.

“People need to understand that these situations are fluid, and it’s not enough to make an assessment a month out and say, ‘I’m good to go.’ You want to monitor the situation quite frequently,” he said.

“Understand that the police response is going to be limited potentially if they go on strike. Know your local hospitals, know how to dial (numbers). Take more personal responsibility t

AFIMAC Global VP Ruben Mena discussing airport security on NBC Impact

July 6th, 2016 Comments off

AFIMAC Global Vice President Ruben Mena discussing airport security in the wake of the Istanbul attacks on NBC WTVJ Channel 6 on “Impact with Jackie Nespral” . Originally aired Sunday, July 3, 2016.

WLTV entrevista sobre los tiradores activos con Ruben Mena, AFIMAC experto en seguridad

June 23rd, 2016 Comments off

WLTV entrevista sobre los tiradores activos con Ruben Mena, experto en seguridad

WLTV interview on active shooter situations and response with Ruben Mena, AFIMAC Global security expert.

Presidente AFIMAC América Latina Ruben Mena analiza la respuesta SWAT en situaciones tirador activos – Telemundo WSCV

June 23rd, 2016 Comments off

SWAT respuesta relacionada con los tiradores activos – Telemundo WSCV Channel 51.

AFIMAC Latin America President Ruben Mena discusses SWAT response in active shooter situations on Telemundo WSCV Channel 51.

AFIMAC CEO, Peter Martin, Quoted in Bloomberg ‘Facebook Spent $12.5 Million to Protect Zuckerberg Since 2013’

April 29th, 2016 Comments off

Capture

Facebook Inc. revealed that it spent $4.26 million on security for Mark Zuckerberg last year, its first disclosure of such costs, and the highest among companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index that have filed proxy statements for fiscal 2015.

The expense brings the total cost from 2013 to 2015 to $12.5 million, according to a regulatory filing. The cost was “to address safety concerns due to specific threats to his safety arising directly as a result of his position as our founder, Chairman, and CEO,” the company said in the filing. Zuckerberg is the world’s eighth-richest person with $47 billion, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index.

Facebook spent $5.6 million for Zuckerberg’s security in 2014 and $2.65 million in 2013. Last year’s expense exceeds the $1.53 million Oracle Corp. spent to protect Executive Chairman Larry Ellison in fiscal 2015 and Amazon.com Inc.’s $1.6 million for Jeff Bezos, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. The figure also outstrips other famous executives. Berkshire Hathaway Inc. paid $370,244 for personal and home security for billionaire Warren Buffett in 2015. Apple Inc. spent $209,151 on Tim Cook.

Facebook made the disclosure this week after the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in August questioned why the costs had never been listed in filings as a taxable perquisite. In response, Facebook argued that a “business-oriented security concern” identified for Zuckerberg exempted it from having to report those expenses. After discussions with SEC staff, the company reversed its position, according to a filing.

Home Security

Facebook spokesman Jonathan Thaw declined to comment. Chief executives of global businesses are often required by their boards to travel on company-provided planes or cars even for personal trips. More than half of firms in the S&P 100 Index had such policies last year.

Facebook provides Zuckerberg with a home security system and guards who also protect his house in San Francisco’s Mission District. The team is overseen by a former U.S. Secret Service agent who protected President Barack Obama.

Security “should be a board of directors’ first and foremost concern,” especially at companies built around a central figure, said Peter Martin, chief executive of security consultancy AFIMAC Global. “As a shareholder, you want to make sure that your CEO is protected.”

Closer Look

That doesn’t come cheap. Each around-the-clock assignment requires four full-time guards, which annually can cost more than $80,000 each, said Christopher Falkenberg, chief executive of New York-based Insite Security Inc.,which provides protection to clients including hedge funds. A security director can earn about $200,000 a year.

Recent terrorist attacks in two European capitals and an office shooting in San Bernardino, California, have prompted some boards to re-examine security. While the risk for a little known top executive may be low, a person’s public prominence can quickly change, much thanks to social media, Falkenberg said.

Oracle’s cost in fiscal 2015 was for security at Ellison’s residence. Home protection systems can include camera surveillance, pressure pads located near doors or walkways to detect movement, and dense vegetation or crushed gravel that’s noisy to walk on beneath windows to deter intruders, AFIMAC’s Martin said.

“It is important to keep the boss safe, but there comes a point — certainly south of the $1 million mark — where shareholders deserve a far clearer explanation of the risks and provisions and the justification,” said Michael Pryce-Jones, director of corporate governance at CtW Investment Group, which advocates for pension funds that collectively manage $250 billion.

Still, rigorous programs that come with steep costs can be warranted for some, said Paul Viollis, CEO of security provider Viollis Group International.

“It all comes down to having fiduciary responsibility,” Viollis said. “Not providing protection would be like going to the Super Bowl with nobody to block for the quarterback.”

Experto en seguridad de América Latina, Arturo Garffer citado en Miami Diario

March 4th, 2016 Comments off

Capture

También se exploró hacia dónde va el voto latinoamericano en el 2016

En el marco de la XIII Cumbre latinoamericana de mercadeo político y gobernanza que se celebra exitosamente en el Wolfson Campus del Miami Dade College, se exploró el impacto que el auge del terrorismo está causando en las formas como se aproxima el mensaje político a los ciudadanos y votantes.

La conferencia estuvo a cargo de Arturo Garffer, ex coronel y experto en seguridad de la empresaAFIMAC Global.

Garffer afirma que el terrorismo en el siglo 21 es asimétrico y muy dinámico. No hay una fuerza militar convencional que pueda prevenir al 100% un ataque en territorio americano o en cualquier parte de Latinoamérica.

“Las fuerzas terroristas sí han podido muy hábilmente venir desde diferentes países de Oriente y norte de África y movilizarse hacia Latinoamérica estableciendo santuarios,  como por ejemplo la triple frontera entre Brasil Paraguay y Argentina, o la frontera entre Colombia y Venezuela, y a partir de los cuales puedan movilizarse hacia los EEUU, dijo Garffer.

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Latin América Director de operaciones

“No se trata entonces de una operación militar solamente sino también generar un movimiento de inteligencia que ser pueda traducirse en acción y prevenir la entrada de estos individuos a nuestros países sino también evitar que puedan establecer comunicaciones directas internas y externas entre ellos.” dijo.

Garffer considera que el Gobierno estadounidense ha sido débil en combatir este fenómeno porque no tienen ni la capacidad no el conocimiento de cómo lidiar con este fenómeno asimétrico. “No peleamos contra un ejército regular. Peleamos contra gente que no se ve e identificar a menos que ellos hagan algo que los ponga a la luz. La administración presente ha sido renuente a tomar riesgos y lamentablemente en los próximos 10 meses no va a cambiar su política. Se va a dedicar a sostener su política de ‘political correctness’, y no cumplir con el principal deber del Presidente de este país que es el de ser Comandante en Jefe y proteger la nación del peligro de otro ataque en nuestro territorio.” dijo.

La XIII Cumbre Latinoamericana de marketing politico y gobernanza continúaba con una interesante ponencia a cargo deCarlis Souto, experto en realización de mensajes políticos que fueron muy exitoso en campañas politicas realizadas en 1999 y 2003 titulado Politicas, Mentiras y Vídeo.

A continuación, el analista político y periodista colombiano Jairo Libreros reflexionó acerca de lo que muchos analistas observan como un cambio en el péndulo político en la región basados en el resultado electoral en Argentina, la victoria de las oposición venezolana en la elecciones parlamentarias el pasado 6 de diciembre y la victoria del No en el referéndum boliviano recién realizado este 21 de febrero.

Libreros difiere de esa visión. El analista es pesimista y cree que aún falta mucho tiempo para que ese cambio de péndulo se realice. En su opinión el Liderazgo autoritario y oportunista se seguirá imponiendo dada la desconfianza del ciudadano hacia las democracia.  El descontento popular y la erosión del público hacia la política es grande.

“No se para dónde va el voto latinoamericano, lo que sí les puedo decir es que de cada 10 votantes, sólo 3 están de acuerdo en mantener la democracia, y por otra parte la política va hacia la manipulación del descontento popular y la lealtad de las fuerzas de seguridad”. Lo que más le preocupa es darse cuenta de que quien pueda manejar la fuerza pública será exitoso en obtener el poder y no hará nada por ser leales a la democracia.

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