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South Florida Business Journal: ‘Peter Martin On Combining Passions For Business And Security’

August 29th, 2016 Comments off

Peter

Peter Martin, CEO of AFIMAC Global, is really in the business development space, even though, on the surface, his day job could be described with one word: security. AFIMAC provides a fleet of security-related services from bodyguards to transport to mitigating kidnapping situations. But what got Martin into the security industry in the first place was a passion for business and a desire to blend security with growth.

AFIMAC and Martin are often consulted by companies looking to enter new international markets or exit markets in sustainable ways. Martin knows which economies and countries are stable, and which may be on the edge of collapse, and he and AFIMAC can provide clients with intelligence on how to safely navigate business opportunities around the globe. AFIMAC’s global headquarters are in Miami.

Where are AFIMAC’s offices?
I’m staring right across the 836 at the Miami International Airport as we speak. Watching planes taking off is actually very soothing. You can see the massive cargo planes taking off. We relocated in 2012, and it’s been very good for us. We’re a global company, [so] it’s a great launch point for all of our services. From a strategic standpoint, it’s been great. We relocated from Cleveland.

Did you always know you were going to go into security? It wasn’t quite that. I come from a family of police officers, and I knew I wanted to do something in the form of private security or law enforcement. I graduated with a law and security administration degree, and from there I got a job in corrections in Canada. I did that for about four years, but corrections is a very difficult world in which to affect change, and I wanted to do something where I could combine business passion with security passion. At that time, in the 1980s, security had a very different view, a pre-9/11 view, and it was really viewed as an impediment to business.

And were you able to merge business and security when you went into cash logistics? After 9/11, security became very popular. When I transferred into cash logistics, to a global armored car company, we had a real position to affect change. The value we brought was business-enabled, and that really sparked a passion for me not to just work in security, but in major crime, as well. There was lot going on – kidnapping of family members, grenades being thrown at armored cars, attacks, etc. It was a real education.

What’s the value of security to business today?
We work with global clients, and what we bring is a different perspective. A lot of our businesses have global footprints and need to go to places that are considered dangerous like Somalia, the Ivory Coast, Brazil, Honduras, etc. We look at the strategic business values and help companies achieve their goals and help them quickly enter the areas they want to enter into.

How many countries have you been to?
Personally, in excess of 80 countries.

What is your day-to-day like?
My day starts out with a combination of internal business; we have six companies in our portfolio. I spend about 70 percent of my day working on internal pieces of business, helping people get to new markets, solving problems. And then the rest is dealing with emergencies. We are in the crisis business, after all.

Do companies consult with you when they’re thinking about entering new markets?
Yes, they do. We’ll provide them with a white paper and analysis when they want to go to a new place. There are opportunities, but there may also be pushback. On the other side, sometimes companies will consult with us if they want to exit a market. For example, if you try to pull out of Venezuela, there are potential criminal charges that could be weighed against the owner.

What do you do outside of work?
Pretty much every minute outside of work is spent with my kids and my wife. We like to do very normal things like take advantage of the beach and try to get away from our smartphones.

How many phones do you have?
I have three cellphones that I rotate. I have a BlackBerry for traveling to certain areas because it just works better. I have a Samsung Galaxy, and a Note Five that is excellent for marking up documents and annotating things on the move. I don’t carry all three all the time, just when I’m traveling.

Peter Martin

Age: 48
Current position: CEO, AFIMAC Global
Past positions: President, AFIMAC Global; VP of Corporate Security & Investigations, Group 4 Securicor Cash Logistics
Birthplace: Brantford, Ontario
Residence: Plantation
Current boards/associations: Board, National Association of Manufacturers; Education Committee, International Security Management Association; Young Presidents’ Organization
Education: Carleton University

AFIMAC CEO Peter Martin discusses Rio Olympics security on Fox News

August 19th, 2016 Comments off

AFIMAC CEO Peter Martin discusses security concerns at Rio 2016 Olympics on Fox News Special Report.

Original Date: August 12, 2016

CEO Peter Martin quoted in The Sun article ‘RIO BOMB THREAT’

August 15th, 2016 Comments off

Page One

A GROUP of eco-terrorists who detonated a nail bomb in Brazil last week have issued a chilling threat to the Rio Olympics – in revenge for ripping up the city to make way for the games.

Extremists at the “Sociedade Secreta Silvestre” organisation – who claimed responsibility for detonating a pressure cooker packed with metal in Brasilia – say they will bomb the Olympics.

They have “declared war” after Rio games chiefs failed to fulfil promises to plant 24 million trees in the city and clean up the polluted Guanabara Bay.

The terrorists were also angered after an Olympic golf course was built on 58,000 square metres of natural park for the games – which had environmentalism as the opening ceremony theme.

A manifesto on the group’s website read: “We will use the Rio 2016 Olympic Games to attack and declare war on hyper-civilisation and its dead world of concrete and steel.

“Our similar units in Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo are as well prepared as the tens of thousands of cowards mobilised to strengthen public security for the Games.

“And guarantee that in the states where events occur they will not pass unharmed but will be severely attacked.

“If you don’t want to be within a blast zone, lock yourselves in your basements and stay there.

“Tourists, if you don’t want to share the same end, go back to your rotting cities. You are not welcome nor will you ever be welcome here, except by our explosives.

“We know there are gaps in security and they will be properly used.”

They claimed to be behind the blast of a pressure cooker device in a car park outside a shopping centre in Brasilia, a few hundred metres from the hotel of the host’s Olympic men’s football team.

The explosion, last week, did not cause any injuries.

Brazilian authorities have played down the threat – but security experts were worried.

Peter Martin, a global security consultant, told The Sun: “Despite all the focus on IS these guys are the only ones to have successfully detonated a bomb with actual intent to do some real damage.

“They’re a pretty serious threat. “This seems to have been suppressed by the government and media in Brazil. Environmental groups wanted a lot of things out of the Olympics they have not got.

“They are also the kind of militants who are very difficult to track.”

CEO Peter Martin discusses security issues at Rio 2016 Olympics on Fox News

August 9th, 2016 Comments off

AFIMAC Global CEO Peter Martin discusses security issues at Rio 2016 Olympics on Fox News Special Report.

CEO Peter Martin quoted in The Sun article ‘Olympics Terror Threat’

August 5th, 2016 Comments off

The Sun

JUST 500 of 3,000 vital screening guards have been recruited for the Rio Olympics.

With just five days to the opening ceremony, desperate organisers are drafting in soldiers and retired cops to fill posts.

The shambles emerged as al-Qaeda kingpin Abu Wa’el Dhiab went off radar amid fears he is heading to Brazil.

The ex-Guantanamo Bay inmate disappeared with five other former lags in neighbouring Uruguay last month.

Terror expert Peter Martin said: “He is a confirmed part of a terrorist organisation that has already demonstrated willingness to attack.”

Screening plans for Olympic venues collapsed after Artel won the £4million contract just weeks ago.

It had no previous experience securing major sporting events and did not have the time to recruit and train thousands of £7-a-day staff.

It echoes London 2012 when G4S failed to take on enough security screeners and the Army stepped in.

Rio officials have mostly drafted in old cops to pat down visitors and man screening kit. Some 41,000 troops are already committed to protecting the troubled games.

Justice Minister Alexandre de Moraes said Artel will be fined.

Dhiab is thought to have attended the same terror training camp as the 9/11 ringleader Mohamed Atta.

He was freed from Guantanamo in 2014 after 12 years and was resettled in Uruguay.

Brazil’s Federal Police have arrested 12 IS fanatics thought to be plotting an attack.

One suspect allegedly wrote: “The Olympics are our opportunity to reach paradise.”

Robert Muggah, a security researcher in Rio said: “Brazilian intelligence officials have now begun to take the threat of Islamists far more seriously”.

Terror concerns emerged as crime-plagued Brazil faced charges of hosting the most shambolic Olympic Games in history.

Rotting corpses have been spotted floating at the rat-infested sailing and wind-surfing venue as officials try to clean it up before the opening ceremony.

Athletes have been robbed at gunpoint and even allegedly kidnapped by gangs of rogue cops on the streets of Rio, where local government has collapsed amid an economic crisis.

The Olympians’ “Disneyland for Athletes” accommodation has also rendered virtually uninhabitable by a putrid open sewer gushing through the village.

And athletes and fans have been also been warned to guard against mosquitoes carrying the Zika virus around the host city.

AFIMAC CEO Peter Martin’s interview with ‘Security Insider: How to stay safe in Rio’

August 5th, 2016 Comments off

AFIMAC CEO Peter Martin’s interview with Canadian Security’s ‘Security Insider: How to stay safe in Rio’.

FocusPoint International: Mickey Winston’s advice on Rio 2016 in Safe Travels Magazine ‘Expert Advice: Is It Safe To Go To The Olympics?’

August 2nd, 2016 Comments off

Expert Advice

Mickey-Winston-profile-picMickey Winston at FocusPoint International

Email: mwinston@wwfocus.com
Website: www.focuspointl.com
Twitter: @mickfpi

FocusPoint is a Global Specialty Risk Consultancy with a focus on Travel Assistance/Crisis Response. We worked in over 100 countries last year and have been responding to crises and evacuating persons for over 30 years.

Mickey has over 25 years in the security industry and has held management positions with several Fortune 100 companies and spent over 10 years managing security for a high net worth Family managing all aspects of both personal and corporate security for their financial firm.  He has extensive experience in corporate investigations, crisis management, physical security and executive protection.  Mickey is a U.S. Marine Corps Veteran, serving 7 years as both an infantry NCO and a Marine Security Guard at US Embassies.

How safe is it to go to the Olympics?

In my opinion, you can travel to pretty much anywhere, depending on your appetite for risk and willingness to implement security measures to ensure your safety.  With regards to Rio De Janeiro, I think it’s safe to attend the Olympics.  The chances of being a victim of a terrorist incident are slim, but the chances of being a victim of a kidnap, robbery or violent crime are more likely.

What are the biggest risks?

The level of street crime is dangerously high and although there will be a massive police and/or military presence in and around the Olympic venues, other areas of the City will not have coverage.  There have been several reports of athletes being victims of express kidnaps and robberies pre-Olympics, and this will probably increase during the Games.

What are the overlooked risks?

While everyone is focused on crime and terrorism, I think the risk of political unrest, getting caught up in some kind of violent protest action is high.  Travelers could unwittingly be cut off from their hotels or groups and then be vulnerable to injury or arrest etc.  The probability of a vehicle accident and/or medical mishap occurring is very high.  The availability of quality medical care and emergency response services will certainly be tested throughout the Olympics.

How should people mitigate this?

Have a plan.  Ensure your plan extends beyond the sights and sounds of the Olympic experience.  Situational awareness is key.  Be aware of your surroundings.  Know the contact numbers for your Embassy or Consulate.  Make sure your mobile device works overseas and you know how to use it locally in Brazil.  Identify medical facilities ahead of time and make sure your insurance will cover you if needed.  If your existing insurance will not cover you, purchase protections that will.  Keep abreast of changing threat dynamics through available media outlets – newspapers, television, social media, etc.  Secure transportation ahead of time and avoid public transportation as much as possible.  Know what to do and where to go if a crisis event occurs during your Olympic experience. Speak with hotel staff or Brazilian friends about what is going on.  Stay away from the area of official Government buildings that might be the focus of a protest or terrorist incident.  Make sure you can get in contact with your fellow travelers, groups in case you get separated.

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